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Overview of Events

At each location, the DISC tour consists of two parts: the DISC Course, a day-long lecture-style presentation in the tradition of SEG DISC courses. Following the course, DISC Lab will be hosted. These are days dedicated to discussion with a subset of interested participants on problems and case histories of local interest, and is an opportunity for tutorials on simulation and inversion.

DISC Course

The course is a 1-day lecture style presentation covering Fundamentals and Applications of Electromagnetic Geophysics. Local case histories pertaining to problems in resource exploration, including oil and gas, minerals, water, environmental, and geotechnical areas will be used as motivation for investigating fundamentals of electromagnetics. The aim of this course is to equip participants with sufficient fundamental understanding and resources about EM geophysics so that they can decide if an EM technique can help solve their problem, select which type of survey to employ, and set realistic expectations for what information can be gleaned.


DISC Lab

The DISC Lab days are designed for a smaller group of geoscientists. We ask participants to provide informal 5 min lightning talks about problems of local interest. We will then work as a group to break down the problems in terms of the 7-Step Framework introduced in course. If participants agree, their talks and results from discussions, will be uploaded to the web. By capturing these problems and state-of-progress onto the web, we hope to promote interaction between geoscientists worldwide. Tutorials on simulations and inversions are also available upon request. There is no registration fee for DISC Lab.





Our goal for the DISC is make an impact by reaching a large number of geoscientists who are connected with diverse applications. This requires involvement of societies, companies or government agencies to act as local sponsors and help identify key contacts. The procedure is outlined in the tree below. We ask people to see where they fit in the tree and if they can provide a local case history and/or encourage other geoscientists to attend. Doing so enables us moderate registration fees by attaining high attendance, increases the diversity of applications, and ensures that the examples presented are relevant and engaging to each audience. Our goal for the DISC is make an impact by reaching a large number of geoscientists who are connected with diverse applications. This requires involvement of societies, companies or government agencies to act as local sponsors and help identify key contacts. The procedure is outlined in the tree below. We ask people to see where they fit in the tree and if they can provide a and/or encourage other geoscientists to attend. Doing so enables us moderate registration fees by attaining high attendance, increases the diversity of applications, and ensures that the examples presented are relevant and engaging to each audience.

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